Prepping for Pets: An Intro

Most of us have at least a rudimentary BOB (Bug Out Bag) or, as I like to call it, a GOODY (Get Out Of Dodge, Yo!) bag for ourselves and other household members. What about our pets?

Regardless of the scenario, you’ll need to make accommodations for your animals, and I’m hammering out a series of posts that will take into consideration the non-human members of your little tribe, focusing primarily on domestic pets rather than livestock.

In the wake of Hurricane Katrina, The Humane Society of the United States cited a Zogby International poll that found that 49 percent of adults say they would refuse to evacuate if they couldn’t take their pets with them. Those who did leave their pets behind doomed their animals to exposure and starvation, and in the  emergencies of long durations–such as Katrina–even beloved, gentle dogs can pack up and become dangerous marauders.

Should you have to evacuate your home, how will you handle your pets? Think long and hard about this question, because your decision will have an emotional impact on you and your family, as well as an impact on the well-being of your animals and the community at large.

What about longterm “bugging-in” scenarios? You’re probably already working out a longterm food storage program for yourself, but how will you feed your animals?

Whether your pet is a pocket Chihuahua a-la Paris Hilton (erk) or a working breed, you’ll benefit from the topics currently in the pipeline:

1. Dog Packs: Great for hiking trips as well as buggin’ out, a well-fitting pack will let your dog carry a portion of her share of gear. We’ll discuss proper fit, materials and appropriate suggestions for what your dog can carry, as well as conditioning your pet for short and long packing trips.

2. Small Animal Carriers: Need to haul your kitty cross town? Maybe you’ve got a bird, ferret or pocket pet. We’ll discuss carrier options, as well as accomodations that will make your pet more welcome if you end up couch-surfing, camping or–heaven forbid–in a shelter situation.

3. Long-Term Pet Prepping: We’ll discuss alternatives to the relatively short shelf-life of dry kibble, and the importance of vaccinations and current vet records.

4. Common Emergency Preps: We all have a plan to evacuate pets during an earthquake, fire or other more common emergency, right?

Bookmark this blog, and check in soon for more on these topics. In the meantime, be sure to check out my Amazon store, where you can find emergency food rations for dogs and cats, as well as other useful pet supplies.

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